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FREEDOM IS NOT FREE
-Cadet Major Kelly

I watched the flag pass by one day.
It fluttered in the breeze.
A young Marine saluted it,
And then He stood at ease.

I looked at him in uniform
So young, so tall, so proud,
With hair cut square and eyes alert.
He’d stand out in any crowd.

I thought how many men like him
Had fallen through the years.
How many died on foreign soil?
How many mothers’ tears?

How many pilots’ planes shot down?
How many died at sea?
How many foxholes were soldiers’ graves?
No, freedom is not free.

I heard the sound of taps one night,
When everything was still.
I listened to the bugler play
And felt a sudden chill.

I wondered just how many times
That taps had meant “Amen,”
When a flag had draped a coffin
Of a brother or a friend.

I thought of all the children,
Of the mothers and the wives,
Of fathers, sons and husbands
With interrupted lives.

I thought about a graveyard
At the bottom of the sea
Of unmarked graves in Arlington.
No freedom is not free.

fastcompany:

By M. Cecelia Bittner—
“We always seem to view our role models as if they’ve made perfect choices every step of the way. If only that were really true!”
Facebook’s NYC headquarters was packed to the brim Tuesday night with career-minded techies looking to gain insight from a panel of some of the tech industry’s leading ladies. The chat was organized by Girls in Tech, a global organization “focused on the engagement, education and empowerment of powerful, influential women in technology and entrepreneurship,” and was moderated by Kickstarter’s Bethany Sumner. 
The conversation covered everything from mentorship to sexism in the workplace, and left guests with a heap of actionable tips. 
Who was there:
AT&T’s Amanda J. Stent
Facebook’s Goranka Bjedov
Bloomberg’s Catherine Hui
Techie/startup founder Nikki Stevens, @drnikki
What they said: 

“I didn’t become who I am by accident. I struggled through the whole journey.” -Catherine Hui (Bloomberg) 
“Don’t say ‘no’ out of fear. Say ‘yes’ to yourself. Know that you are worth it and that you can do it.” -Amanda J. Stent (AT&T)
 “If you’re playing World of Warcraft 25 hours a week, you’re probably hiding from something in your life.” -Goranka Bjedov (Facebook)


“Make mistakes. Just don’t make the same mistake five times.” -Bjedov
“Until I fail empirically, I am good enough to do the job.”  -Nikki Stevens (formerly Refinery29)



What’s the biggest career mistake you’ve ever made, and how did you overcome it? Looking back, what piece of advice would you give your younger self? Tell us on Twitter with #FCadvice. 
Zoom Info
fastcompany:

By M. Cecelia Bittner—
“We always seem to view our role models as if they’ve made perfect choices every step of the way. If only that were really true!”
Facebook’s NYC headquarters was packed to the brim Tuesday night with career-minded techies looking to gain insight from a panel of some of the tech industry’s leading ladies. The chat was organized by Girls in Tech, a global organization “focused on the engagement, education and empowerment of powerful, influential women in technology and entrepreneurship,” and was moderated by Kickstarter’s Bethany Sumner. 
The conversation covered everything from mentorship to sexism in the workplace, and left guests with a heap of actionable tips. 
Who was there:
AT&T’s Amanda J. Stent
Facebook’s Goranka Bjedov
Bloomberg’s Catherine Hui
Techie/startup founder Nikki Stevens, @drnikki
What they said: 

“I didn’t become who I am by accident. I struggled through the whole journey.” -Catherine Hui (Bloomberg) 
“Don’t say ‘no’ out of fear. Say ‘yes’ to yourself. Know that you are worth it and that you can do it.” -Amanda J. Stent (AT&T)
 “If you’re playing World of Warcraft 25 hours a week, you’re probably hiding from something in your life.” -Goranka Bjedov (Facebook)


“Make mistakes. Just don’t make the same mistake five times.” -Bjedov
“Until I fail empirically, I am good enough to do the job.”  -Nikki Stevens (formerly Refinery29)



What’s the biggest career mistake you’ve ever made, and how did you overcome it? Looking back, what piece of advice would you give your younger self? Tell us on Twitter with #FCadvice. 
Zoom Info
fastcompany:

By M. Cecelia Bittner—
“We always seem to view our role models as if they’ve made perfect choices every step of the way. If only that were really true!”
Facebook’s NYC headquarters was packed to the brim Tuesday night with career-minded techies looking to gain insight from a panel of some of the tech industry’s leading ladies. The chat was organized by Girls in Tech, a global organization “focused on the engagement, education and empowerment of powerful, influential women in technology and entrepreneurship,” and was moderated by Kickstarter’s Bethany Sumner. 
The conversation covered everything from mentorship to sexism in the workplace, and left guests with a heap of actionable tips. 
Who was there:
AT&T’s Amanda J. Stent
Facebook’s Goranka Bjedov
Bloomberg’s Catherine Hui
Techie/startup founder Nikki Stevens, @drnikki
What they said: 

“I didn’t become who I am by accident. I struggled through the whole journey.” -Catherine Hui (Bloomberg) 
“Don’t say ‘no’ out of fear. Say ‘yes’ to yourself. Know that you are worth it and that you can do it.” -Amanda J. Stent (AT&T)
 “If you’re playing World of Warcraft 25 hours a week, you’re probably hiding from something in your life.” -Goranka Bjedov (Facebook)


“Make mistakes. Just don’t make the same mistake five times.” -Bjedov
“Until I fail empirically, I am good enough to do the job.”  -Nikki Stevens (formerly Refinery29)



What’s the biggest career mistake you’ve ever made, and how did you overcome it? Looking back, what piece of advice would you give your younger self? Tell us on Twitter with #FCadvice. 
Zoom Info

fastcompany:

By M. Cecelia Bittner

“We always seem to view our role models as if they’ve made perfect choices every step of the way. If only that were really true!”

Facebook’s NYC headquarters was packed to the brim Tuesday night with career-minded techies looking to gain insight from a panel of some of the tech industry’s leading ladies. The chat was organized by Girls in Tech, a global organization “focused on the engagement, education and empowerment of powerful, influential women in technology and entrepreneurship,” and was moderated by Kickstarter’s Bethany Sumner. 

The conversation covered everything from mentorship to sexism in the workplace, and left guests with a heap of actionable tips. 

Who was there:

What they said: 

“I didn’t become who I am by accident. I struggled through the whole journey.” -Catherine Hui (Bloomberg) 

“Don’t say ‘no’ out of fear. Say ‘yes’ to yourself. Know that you are worth it and that you can do it.” -Amanda J. Stent (AT&T)

 “If you’re playing World of Warcraft 25 hours a week, you’re probably hiding from something in your life.” -Goranka Bjedov (Facebook)

“Make mistakes. Just don’t make the same mistake five times.” -Bjedov

“Until I fail empirically, I am good enough to do the job.”  -Nikki Stevens (formerly Refinery29)

What’s the biggest career mistake you’ve ever made, and how did you overcome it? Looking back, what piece of advice would you give your younger self? Tell us on Twitter with #FCadvice. 

She nursed your wounds and gave you your first bowl haircut. She dried your tears, got the grass stains out of your jeans and handled the family finances. She packed your lunch, dropped you off on your first date, let you wear your superhero cape to school and made sure you bathed before you left. She worked hard, and she did an amazing job. In fact, she did many amazing jobs — out of the goodness of her heart.

What if she did get paid for all the work she did for you and your siblings? To honor of all the fantastic moms out there (and to remind you how much she deserves your gratitude), we took a just-for-fun look at what mom would make if she got monetary compensation for all her many amazing talents.

The least you could do is give her a fantastic Mothers Day.

Thanks, Mom
-prfaccounting.wordpress.com

Admitting You Were Wrong Doesn’t Make You Weak It Makes You Awesome!

If we want to be genuinely successful in both business and life, we have to be willing to set aside our pride, our fears, and our insecurities, and really come to recognize that to be a true leader that is deserving of their position of authority, we must earn – not demand – the respect of our co-workers.

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